Museum of the Moving Image Visit

Happy Monday!

This past week I made the trek out to Astoria to visit the Museum of the Moving Image. I got so caught up in the amazing Yelp reviews, I forgot that I’m not really too much of a movie buff [read: I don’t know the difference between Clint Eastwood and Sean Connery]. Thankfully, I was accompanied by the textbook definition of a media connoisseur, so luckily he was able to break down for me everything from details of film projector extinction to why I need to add Being John Malkovich to my ever-growing “Stuff I need to watch” list.

Museum of the Moving Image1Museum of the Moving Image Collage

Some of my favorite parts of the museum were seeing some of the costumes used in movies/television (pictured above is an actual Cosby sweater), this really sick thing called a strobeatrope which I can’t even accurately explain, and the text message translating game by the museum’s entry. Overall, the museum was a pretty good experience, and on Fridays after 4pm it’s donation-based (i.e. free, unless you get the mean man working the desk who basically threatens to melon-ball out your eyeballs if you don’t donate). I would especially recommend it for normal people who have an average or beyond knowledge of movies/the film industry, unlike myself. I guess I just spend my spare time surfing Buzzfeed and watching reruns of The O.C.? My poor underdeveloped brain cells.

Paley Center Visit

Due largely in part to some technical, internet-related glitches (and not at all due to busyness or laziness on my part), I missed a few posting days. Sorry about that. The following was intended to be my first “Museum Monday” post (a little something I’m trying out), but it’s Tuesday… so I guess Touristy Tuesday it is?

Ever since I began my new commute [from hell], I pass the subway station advertisement for the Museum of Television and Radio twice per day. Since it sounded like something up my alley, I did a little research and found that it was renamed the Paley Center for Media a few years back, but I wanted to check it out nonetheless.

Unless you’re attending a specific speaker or screening at the building, you go up to a room and basically watch TV for 90 minutes. They have a bunch of old (and new) programs and clips archived and easily accessible through their computers. I’d imagine this would have been a lot more unique in the days before YouTube, but I was still able to surface some cool footage I would never have otherwise searched for on the web. Conan O’Brien’s first monologue, old footage of Elaine May and Mike Nichols, a feature on Lucille Ball and an interview with Jerry Seinfeld from the 80’s were some of my picks.

Paley Center Collage